Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Big Burly Bur Oak


This is my big burly Bur Oak, leafing out and shedding delicate little wisps of pollen. Hardly looks like the giant that it is.

Quercus macrocarpa, also called Burr Oak, is a slow-growing, tall tree that lives a long life. It develops a massive trunk and is a great shade and windbreak tree. It is very adaptable, and its leaves turn yellow, lime green and rust in the fall. Research shows that the tree will bear acorns in the nursery in 10 years.

My Bur oak is now 10 years old, and dropped one lone but very large acorn for me two months ago.

12 comments:

Caroline said...

Love how you've captured the light in your photo. We've had our bur oak in the ground two or three years and it's already given us several ginormous acorns! It's just a little sprout, too.

Diana said...

Your Bur Oak must be vigorous. Mine was stressed last summer. It's the tree I sat under in the lawn chair with a garden mag in my lap and the hose in my hand to hand water it during water rationing. Kinda my baby (BIG baby!)

Jayne said...

A neighbor had a bur oak where I used to live. It was a very regal kind of tree, I always loved it.

LindaCTG said...

What a lovely picture! And such a great tree. Sorry I missed Design day, but looks like you had a great time & I know your head is spinning with ideas. Cute shot of the "interloper" too!

RBell said...

My father has several large Bur Oaks in his Fort Worth backyard; the size of their leaves and acorns are quite impressive. However, as the branches stretch out over his house, he also gets to hear the explosive sound of the great acorns ricocheting off his roof during fall windstorms!

Sharon Lovejoy said...

Love this oak and adore the big acorns they produce. Couldn't stop picking them up when I saw them and when I show them to children they don't believe that they're looking at an acorn! Oh Mother Nature.

All joys to you,

Sharon Lovejoy Writes from Sunflower House and a Little Green Island

Lancashire rose said...

This is such a beautiful tree and you are lucky to have one. The first time I saw one of those acorns I couldn't believe its size. I picked some up and sprayed them gold for Christmas. None of those around here though.

getgrounded said...

I love our oaks, Diana, but just seeing that string of sneeze-inducing pollen reminds me I'm about to be inundated here with the next round of oak droppings! Beautiful pic.

Diana said...

Jayne - It is very regal - something majestic about it. Only thing I could do without is those giant leaves when they fall!

LindaCTG - We missed you Sat. and yes, my head IS spinning with ideas. So cool to get to pull from so many good plans.

RBell - Never thought about what it would be like to have those big things clattering on your roof. Thank goodness my tree isn't that close to the house!

Sharon - The kids do get a kick out of those acorns. My daughter did a seed collection for her science fair project a few months ago and loved being able to have that giant next to lots of little bitty ones.

Diana said...

Lancashire Rose - Using them for holiday decor is a great idea. I put them in their natural state with some evergreens for decorating. And it's trendy to bring things in from the outdoors now, ha - we've been doing it for years.

GetGrounded - yes, it's time for the pollen. Mine's started dropping from the live oaks in the back. I suppose it's one reason to be thankful for all the wind - maybe it will all blow away quickly!

Lisa at Greenbow said...

I just love these trees. The catkins on it are quite beautiful.

Diana said...

Lisa -- They are amazing, aren't they? Amazing how they can be so big and powerful looking and delicate all at the same time.