Saturday, January 30, 2010

Plants with interest in Winter

With yesterday's beating rain, and last night's predicted freeze, I decided to cut my first two daffodils and bring them inside to enjoy.

It was just too painful to watch the only flowers in my garden lying prone on the ground in a puddle.

So I rescued them.

Now I can sit and look at them beside me this morning while I enjoy a cup of tea and blog by the fireplace.

They seem to be enjoying my company inside!

While looking around the garden at all the dead, dying and dormant plants, I found a few bright spots.
Like this native Yaupon Holly, Ilex vomitoria, growing wild in our wooded area. It's chock-full of beautiful berries - a splash of bright red against the palette of browns that's overtaken the garden.
And then there is the Leatherleaf Mahonia, Mahonia bealei, which is most interesting in winter. In some other states, it's been declared invasive, but not in Texas. It's not for everyone, or everywhere, with its upright and prickly form, but does provide unique structure in the garden. Its new winter growth erupts into a few dozen spires of tiny yellow bell-like flowers.
Although the sedum in the hanging planter is long-since dead - a few little Hens and Chicks found their way into the pot and seem to be quite happy.
I kept hearing the Woodpecker outside this week and finally got a picture of him as he landed close to the breakfast room window while looking for his bugs.
This -- not so pretty, huh? On the left - a big HOLE! On the right? the roots of a previously chewed up Agapanthus that have now been ripped out of the ground. I moved them all from the back so Dakota wouldn't eat them, so now the deer are eating them! And if that weren't enough, then they are coming back to rip out the roots! Argh.

So the big question is, will I try to plant them around the pretty bird bath in the front again or will I give in a go another route to spare myself the aggravation? What do you think?

15 comments:

Cyndy said...

Beautiful pictures! I suspect those hens and chicks are the actually the sedum coming back to life - looks like the ones I found outside before our arctic blast came...

Diana said...

Cyndy - Thanks -- I had a different kind in there with them -- I think those babies were hiding under it!

Janet said...

Oh Diana, seems you can't win with your Agapanthus! What a shame. Can you bring them back to the sidewalk area they were before and put some chickenwire over them?? Maybe that will help limit the digging and eating?
Lovely daffodils. Nice to have a little spring color inside.

Janet said...

Oh Diana, seems you can't win with your Agapanthus! What a shame. Can you bring them back to the sidewalk area they were before and put some chickenwire over them?? Maybe that will help limit the digging and eating?
Lovely daffodils. Nice to have a little spring color inside.

Linda/Central Texas Gardener said...

You do have a lot of lovelies in winter! I cut one of my Erlicheer flowers today since it was flopped on the ground. The fragrance indoors is wonderful. Wonderful shot of the woodpecker!

Cindy, MCOK said...

Great idea to cut the daffodils and bring them inside! I've gotten behind on reading blogs but I'm all caught up on yours now. Here's to a fabulous February for both of us!

Diana said...

Janet - You're right - as my Dad would say, I can't win for losing! I am hoping once I get some more things planted around there and the Agapanthus mature, they might leave them alone (maybe). Problem is, they looked great around the birdbath.

Linda/CTG - I do love having flowers inside, especially when it's cold like this and I am not spending time to enjoy them outside.

Cindy - I seem to be perpetually behind, too, but these cooler temps are helping me spend more time online. Hope it warms up soon!

Gail said...

How frustrating...I think the agapanthus could go into a beautiful container and placed out of reach until they are ready to bloom..gail

fairegarden said...

You did the right thing with the daffs, Diana! They are so cheering inside the house and will just be ruined outside by heavy rains. Those are the only type of flower that gets cut here when the weather threatens. As for the agapanthus, if there is a deer safe spot for them somewhere, fine. If not, find something more deer proof?
Frances

Hapi said...

hello... hapi blogging... have a nice day! just visiting here....

Jayne said...

What darling daffodils. Something to cheer you up :-) Sorry to hear about your agapanthus.

getgrounded said...

Somehow I missed this post. Love seeing those daffodils indoors, and what a nice bloom shape they have. I can't wait to see your bed filled with them. When is that promised rain coming, anyway?

Anonymous said...

What a great resource!

Urban Gardens said...

Just discovered your blog via Twitter. Really enjoyed the photos!

Diana said...

Gail - I think I might put a little wire fence around there to act as a deterrent...or plant some land mines!!!

Fairegarden -- But I WANT the Agapanthus! Stubborn, I know! They aren't supposed to eat them, but we all know that those "deer restistant" guidelines are written by comedy writers!

Jayne -- The daffodils were so cheerful, and they lasted a really long time, too.

Urban Gardens - glad you found me here - thanks for visiting.